Every year, February 4th, the World Cancer Day gives us the right to give support to all over the world, to raise the collective voice, to take personal action, and to pressure governments to do more. The World Cancer Day is the only day of the global health calendar where we can all unite under one sign, the sign of fighting cancer in a positive and inspiring way.

February 4, 2019 is dedicated to raising awareness to fight against cancer and encouraging its prevention, detection and treatment.

 

The theme for 2019 is “I am and I will” – everything is about your story and your engagement.

Cancer is a large group of diseases, which include uncontrolled cell growth. Cells divide and grow uncontrollably, forming malignant tumors. Cancer can spread to surrounding tissues, and can also be extended to the more distant parts of the body through the lymphatic system or bloodstream. Not all tumors are cancerous.

Cancer causes 20% of deaths in the European region. Each year, with more than 3 million new cases and 1.7 million deaths, cancer is the most important cause of death and morbidity in Europe after cardiovascular disease.

It is estimated that the number of cancer deaths will double in the next 20 to 40 years, with the highest increase in low- and middle-income countries, that is, those countries that have less chance to cope with the social and economic impact of the disease.

Cancer can be avoided in many cases, and early detection significantly increases the possibility of treatment. Already enough is known about the causes of cancer in order to prevent at least one third of all types of cancer, and some of the most common types – including breast cancer, colorectal and cervical cancer – can be cured if detected early.

Globally, more than 70% of all cancer deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries that have little or no resources to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer. Regardless of the level of resources, all countries can implement the four basic components of cancer control – prevention, early detection, diagnosis and treatment, and palliative care – and thus avoid the emergence of many new cancer cases, many cases to heal, and to reduce the suffering of cancer patients.

 

MORTALITY OF MALIGNANT NEOPLAZMES IN R. MACEDONIA

In the Republic of Macedonia, after diseases of the circulatory system, malignant neoplasms are the second most common cause of death. In 2010, 3705 died from cancer, and 3715 in 2017, while the mortality rate ranged from 180.3 to 100,000 in 2010 to 179.1% in 2017.

Diagram 1: Mortality rate from malignant neoplasms in the Republic of Macedonia, 2010 – 2017

Source: Institute of Public Health

According to gender, in 2010, the number of dead males from malignant neoplasms was 2218 with a rate of 215.4 per 100,000 men, and the number of dead women 1487 with a rate of 145.1 per 100,000 women. This number in 2017 in the male population is 2189 with a rate of 210.7% 000, and in the female population this number is 1526 with a rate of 147.4% 000.

 

Diagram 2: Mortality rate from malignant neoplasms by gender in the Republic of Macedonia, 2010 – 2017

Source: Institute of Public Health

 

The most common primary sites of malignant neoplasms

In men, the most common cause of death from malignant neoplasms in the period 2010-2017 is malignant neoplasm of bronchus and lungs with a mortality rate ranging from 64.8 in 2010 to 66.9 in 2014 and 58.2 per 100000 men in 2017.

 

Diagram 3: Mortality rate from malignant neoplasm of bronchus and lung in the Republic of Macedonia in men, 2010 – 2017

Source: Institute of Public Health

In women, the most common cause of death from malignant neoplasms in the period 2010-2017 is malignant neoplasm of the breast. The mortality rate ranged from 30.0 in 2010 to 26.9 in 2017 to 100 000 women.

 

Diagram 4: Mortality rate from malignant neoplasm of breast in the Republic of Macedonia in women, 2010 – 2017